Putting water out for wildlife

17/01/2020

Australia is currently in the grip of a bushfire crisis. The combination of prolonged drought and the country’s catastrophic bushfire season have had a devastating effect on our precious wildlife.

By leaving out a safe, reliable supply of drinking water, you can help keep distressed animals hydrated until the natural environment recovers.

While some parts of the country have received much needed rain, other habitats have severely depleted sources of clean drinking water.

However, you can help to protect wild animals from these extreme conditions by taking a few simple steps.

Here are 10 things to consider:

  1. Place water containers or dispensers around your yard – or farm, at regular intervals
  2. Water containers/dispensers should be easily accessible to clean and refill with fresh water. They should also be located away from any roads.
  3. Ensure the containers have no sharp edges or features that could cut, harm or ensnare wildlife.
  4. To provide water for a wide range of birds and animals of different sizes, use containers of different depths and place them at different heights.
  5. Also ensure the water containers have a means of escape for small animals who may fall in, become exhausted and drown. Sticks and large, flat stones can provide a safe way out.
  6. The containers must be monitored, and the water changed regularly to prevent the spread of diseases.
  7. Ideally, containers should be placed near where natural sources of water normally occur; and yet be portable enough to be easily relocated.
  8. Place containers beneath trees to provide birds and small animals with a means of escape from predators. Trees also provide valuable shade for distressed animals on the hottest of days.
  9. Ensure your pets are kept indoors, and well away from the water containers, to further protect vulnerable wildlife.
  10. Naturally, once a clean, reliable water supply returns within the environment, the artificial water dispensers should be removed, cleaned and stored for future use.

By leaving out a safe, reliable supply of drinking water, you can help keep distressed animals hydrated until the natural environment recovers.

Thank you for everything you do to protect vulnerable animals here and around the world.

 

(Header Image: Peter Tremain)

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