Protecting animals in devastated Sulawesi

04 October 2018

Last Friday, a magnitude 7.5 earthquake struck Sulawesi, Indonesia, triggering a tsunami that devastated everything in its path.

Credit line: Carl Court/Getty Images ASIAPAC/Getty images/AFP

So far, at least 1400 people have died, and hundreds more are missing. More than 200,000 people need urgent help and the tsunami destroyed more than 66,000 homes. Disasters don’t discriminate and many animals are also suffering. Unfortunately, animals are often the forgotten victims.

Right now, animals in Sulawesi, Indonesia urgently need veterinary care, food, water and shelter before they succumb to injuries, disease and starvation. Thanks to our supporters, our disaster response team are there to help.

Our Disaster Response Manager, Dr Naritsorn Pholperm, described his first impressions on reaching Makassar:

"There are only a few people who have been able to travel to ground zero, only humanitarian assistance workers… We will probably be the first animal welfare organisation to get there. We are going to try our best to ensure we provide assistance for animals in time…”

In Palu, losses remain unknown, as communications are down, and bridges and roads have been destroyed or blocked by landslides. Connectivity in the area is limited, but our disaster response team has now arrived in Palu City and are making plans to support vulnerable animals.

The team has an initial supply of dry dog food, wet pet food, and some medicines for treating minor injuries, but this is just the beginning in a potentially long process.

We never know when a disaster will strike. But our dedicated teams are ready to go at a moment’s notice and will work around the clock in a disaster zone. They just need the funds to make this possible.

Your kindness could help save the lives of countless suffering animals. Please donate today to help save the lives of animals affected by disasters around the world.

Image: PALU, INDONESIA - OCTOBER 02: People try to move a cow as it sits in the rubble of destroyed buildings following an earthquake, on October 02, 2018 in Palu, Indonesia. Indonesias disaster response agency confirmed on Tuesday that the death toll from Friday’s earthquake and tsunami has reached at least 1,234 people while fears that the death toll could rise again. A tsunami triggered by a magnitude 7.5 earthquake slammed into Indonesia's coastline on the island of Sulawesi as people are increasingly growing desperate for food, fuel, and water, while emergency services fear that survivors may still be trapped under the rubble.

 

"There are only a few people who have been able to travel to ground zero, only humanitarian assistance workers… We will probably be the first animal welfare organisation to get there. We are going to try our best to ensure we provide assistance for animals in time…”